GOVERNMENT STATISTICS ON DOMESTIC ABUSE (March 2016) Estimated prevalence of domestic abuse England and Wales 1995 – 2014/15

Detailed British Crime Surveys of Intimate Abuse:

Twelve detailed surveys of intimate domestic abuse/violence in England and Wales have been carried out since 1995 as supplements to the regular British Crime Surveys, each using a computer-assisted self-completion questionnaire to assist confidentiality in interviews.

Year 1995: Home Office Research Study 191, January 1999
Year 2001: Home Office Research Study 276, March 2004
Year 2004/05: Home Office On-line Report 12/06, 2006
Year 2005/06: Home Office Statistical Bulletin 02/07, 25 January 2007
Year 2006/07: Home Office Statistical Bulletin 03/08, 31 January 2008
Year 2007/08: Home Office Statistical Bulletin 02/09, 22 January 2009
Year 2008/09: Home Office Statistical Bulletin 11/09, Vol 1, July 2009
Year 2009/10: Home Office Statistical Bulletin 01/11, 20 January 2011
Year 2010/11: Home Office Statistical Bulletin 02/12, 19 January 2012
Year 2011/12: ONS Statistical Bulletin: Focus on: Violent Crime and Sexual Offences,
2011/12, 7 February 2013
Year 2012/13: ONS Crime Survey for England and Wales. Focus on Violent Crime and
Sexual Offences. 13 February 2014
Year 2013/14 ONS Crime Statistics, Focus on Violent Crime and Sexual Offences
20013/14, 12 February 2015
Year 2014/15 ONS Crime Survey for England and Wales: Statistical Bulletin: Chapter 4

  • Intimate personal violence and partner abuse. 11 February 2016

The results of the last ten detailed studies show consistently a substantial level of female abuse and violence in intimate (partner) relationships, with a corresponding level of male victimisation, although there are small fluctuations. Over this period, for any form of partner abuse or violence (including sexual and stalking), proportions of male victims (of total victims) have ranged between about 30% (year 2013/14) to 46% (year 2007/08) and for the category of ‘severe force’ between about 35% (year 2009/10) to 49% (year 2006/07). The category of ‘severe force’ was not included in the 2013/14 and 2014/15 statistics.

The chart below shows the proportions of male victims (out of total male and female victims) of any partner abuse (including sexual) and of non-sexual force in partner relationships from these ten detailed studies for each last-year period.

Statistical Bulletin Chapter 4: V Intimate personal violence and partner abuse

Main points:

  • Based on an unweighted base of 18,887 people, and confidential self-completion computerised
    modules, 8.2% of women and 4.0% of men reported having experienced some form of
    domestic abuse (non-sexual partner abuse, non-sexual family abuse, sexual assault, stalking)
    carried out by a former partner or other family member during the year ending March 2015. This
    is equivalent to an estimated 1.3 million female victims and 600,000 male victims.
  • 6.5% of women and 2.8% of men reported having experienced some form of partner abuse
    during the last year, equivalent to an estimated 1.1 million female victims and 500,000 male
    victims. Male victims accounted for 39% of all victims suffering non-sexual family abuse, 30%
    of victims of non-sexual partner abuse, 20% of victims of sexual assault, and 33% of victims of
    stalking.
  • 27.1% of women and 13.2% of men reported having experienced some form of domestic abuse
    since the age of 16, equivalent to an estimated 4.5 million female victims and 2.2 million male
    victims.
  • The number of sexual offences in the year (88,100) was the highest figure recorded by the
    police since the introduction of the National Crime Recording Standard in 2002. As well as
    improvements in recording practise, this is thought to reflect a greater willingness of victims to
    come forward to report such crimes.
    Dewar Research March 2016
    Government Statistics on Domestic Violence
    Estimated prevalence of domestic violence – England and Wales 1995-2011/12
  • Violence without injury accounted for almost half (48%) of all CSEW violent incidents in the
    year, while the more serious crimes of assault with minor injury and wounding accounted for
    27% and 24% respectively.
  • Consistent with previous years, the proportion of adult victims of violent crime varied by
    personal and household characteristics. For example, males were more likely to be a victim of
    violent crime than females, as were adults, aged 16 to 24, compared with all other age groups.
    Adults in low income households were more likely to be a victim than those in higher income
    groups.
  • Similar to the previous year, 49% of violent incidents became known to the police compared
    with 40% for all incidents of CSEW crime.

British Crime Survey estimates of numbers of incidents:

Up until 2001, estimated numbers of incidents of domestic violence in England and Wales were given in a series of British Crime Surveys (BCSs) published by the Home Office generally every two years. Since 2001, estimated numbers have been given in the Home Office Crime in England and Wales annual publications. The estimates are based on people reporting actions against them perceived as crimes. Since not all people regard domestic abuse against them, even if serious, as a crime, particularly young men, and therefore may not report it (or wish to admit it) to
crime surveys, these Home Office crime estimates are likely to significantly under-estimate the actual extent of domestic violence, particularly against young men.

Estimated numbers of incidents of domestic violence in England and Wales during the 15-year period 1995 to 2009/10, based on these crime estimates and other Home Office sources, are tabulated below. The trends over this period in estimated numbers of incidents and the proportions of male victims, based on these, are indicated on the accompanying two charts.

Supplement to 2008/09 BCS
Crime in England and Wales 2008/09
Summary of main findings

Home Office Statistical Bulletin 11/09 Volume 1, July 2009:

This supplementary computer assisted self-completion module on intimate violence was based on interviews with a nationally representative sample of some 23,500 persons, about 10,900 men and 12,600 women.

The proportions of male victims estimated by this survey were slightly down on those found in the previous surveys. Even so, they still represent a substantial level of female aggression in intimate relationships.

In the year preceding the survey, and excluding stalking, 4.4% of women and 2.7% of men reported having suffered non-sexual partner abuse (as defined above), a proportion of male victims of 38.0% (compared to 45.6% in the 2007/08 survey). Of these, 2.2% of women and 1.2% of men reported suffering actual force, a proportion of male victims of 35.3%, which was designated as ‘severe’ in the case of 1.5% of women and 0.9% of men, a proportion of male victims of about 37.5% (compared to 48.3% in 2007/08) (Table 3.11).

In the same period, 4.4% of women and 2.8% of men reported suffering stalking, a proportion of male victims of 38.9 (Table 3.11). The prevalence of stalking reported by both men and women was significantly lower than estimated in the previous surveys.

In the longer term, since the age of 16, and again excluding stalking, the survey estimated that 21.4% of women and 10.1% of men reported having suffered non-sexual partner abuse, a proportion of male victims of about 32. (compared to 39.0% in the 2007/08 survey). Of these, 16.6% women and 6.9% men reported having suffered actual force, a proportion of male victims of 29.4%, which was designated as ‘severe’ in the case of 12.8% of women and 5.7% of men, a proportion of male victims of 30.8% (compared to 38.6% in the 2007/08 survey) (Table 3.11). Some 19.9% of women and 10.2% of men reported having experienced stalking since the age of 16, a proportion of male victims of 33.9 (Table 3.11).

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